Rescued Cats: Before and After (13 amazing photos)

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Rescued Cats: Before and After (13 amazing photos).

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Mews: This Kitten’s Mom Rejected Her. What Happened After She met This Golden Retriever is just amazing

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Katzenworld

Hi everyone,

We found this amazing and heart warming story the other day and just had to share it with you all.

What happened after this cat met a Golden Retriever stole the heart of the online community! And it is a brilliant proof of how cats and dogs don’t have to be enemies 😉

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Ichimi the kitten was rejected by her own mother. Lost and alone, Ichimi had a slim chance of survival on her own. Luckily, the orphaned kitten was rescued into a loving family.

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Ichimi’s new family has fostered many homeless kittens, so Ichimi’s arrival at their home was accepted by all of the other pets in the family. But the moment Ponzu the Golden Retriever saw Ichimi, he instantly fell in love and started caring for her.

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Naturally nurturing, Ponzu has fostered little kittens and seems to have a soft spot for the little needy ones. After losing…

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10 Tips to Keep Your Cat Happy Indoors

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Start young
Kittens who are kept indoors usually show no desire to venture outside when they grow up.

Fence me in
Provide a screened porch or other safe way for your cat to experience the
outdoors. Consider building or purchasing a “cat fence” or similar enclosure.

Walk this way
If you live in a peaceful neighborhood in which you can walk without encountering loose dogs, consider buying a harness and training your cat to walk on a leash.

Play time
Play with your cat each day. Try different types of toys that allow your cat to stalk, chase, pounce, and kick.

Find out six more tips from The Humane Society of the United States IMG_7928.JPG

Relationships between cats and owners

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Relationships between cats and owners have a similar dynamics than the relationships between babies and parents: The parents act as caregivers and the cats as dependant furry babies. Cats have needs, and they understand that humans are the way by which their needs will be satisfied. This does not mean that cats view humans as their slaves; it only means that cats feel the same vulnerability as an infant, and they share that timid egoism that babies have toward the world as they are psychologically incapable of putting themselves in someone else’s shoes or head. Also, their needs are not limited to being fed; they want to feel protected and loved. Sounds similar?

While cats are not hesitant to communicate those needs to their owners, they do adapt their speech according to their owner’s personalities. They take into account what works best with their owners, what is well understood, instead of just screaming their needs with no regard to the person at the other end. Cats do listen, and they try to interpret their owner’s actions to get feedback. For example, an owner who talks a lot to his or her cat will most probably end up with a very vocal cat, while an owner that is very attentive to his or her cat’s actions might have a cat which discretely stands in front on his bowl when hungry.

And this communication adaptability goes beyond communicating needs: Cats and their owners strongly influence each other’s actions and personalities. Have you noticed how outgoing owners tend to have more active and sociable cats than timid and introverted owners?

Cats and humans do share an incredible bond. Interestingly, this bond is even stronger between women and cats, regardless of the cat’s sex. Cats tend to go toward women, and this is true even if the owner is a man. Would you say this is true under your roof?

Read more from Veronique

TWENTY STEPS TO BEING A GOOD PET OWNER

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1. Choose a type of pet or the breed which is compatible with your lifestyle.

2. Your pet is totally dependent on you for food, water and shelter.

3. Make sure you feed your pet at regular times with a diet suitable for its age and species.

4. Fresh, clean water should be available at all times. Make sure the water container cannot be accidentally tipped over.

5. Provide shelter from rain, the cold in Winter and the heat in Summer.

6. Make sure your pet receives any vaccinations required for protection against contagious diseases.

7. Regularly worm your pet.

8. If you do not intend to breed from your dog or cat have it desexed.

9. If you do decide to breed from your pet, be prepared to keep the offspring until you can find responsible homes for them.

10. Do not let your pet be tormented by fleas — during flea season use an appropriate flea control product.

11. Groom your pet on a regular basis to keep it free from mats and tangles. Even shorthaired pets enjoy a brushing.

12. If you suspect your pet may be unwell seek immediate veterinary advice.

13. Comply with all local government regulations for keeping pets.

14. Ensure that your dog is securely confined on your own property.

15. For your cat’s safety make sure it is indoors after dark.

16. Carry a ‘pooper-scooper’ bag to clean up after your dog when out walking.

17. Do not allow your dog to bark unnecessarily.

18. Make sure your dog and cat wear identification tags at all times, or are microchipped.

19. Teach your pet dog manners. Enroll in your local dog training classes.

20. Provide your pet with appropriate exercise.

Read more from Petcare Information and Advisory Service Australia

College students abandon pets as they leave campus

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Many university graduates who had once doted over pets are abandoning cats and dogs as they leave campus, leaving the pets to the mercy of volunteer caregivers.

Many dogs and cats are abandoned after their owners lose the excitement they had felt when they had first got a pet and may then come to recognize just how much work and energy it takes to raise an animal, Gong added.

The increasing number of stray pets on campus has proved a headache for administrators.

“Their numbers increase every year when students are about to graduate,” said Gu Jie, a logistic worker at Southwest University of Political Science and Law, who often feeds homeless cats and dogs on the campus.

She said university workers recently expelled some dogs to make the campus safer.

Chen Mingcai, head of the Association of Small Animal Protection in Chongqing, said the number of abandoned pets has increased on campuses because many students have recently taken a fancy to the idea of keeping a pet and are unaware of how large a responsibility they would be taking on by having one.

Some students exchange pets as gifts or symbols of love. But the fun often ebbs away when the owners are under pressure to finish dissertations and find a job, he said.

Read more from China Daily

ANIMAL HEALTH NOT A PRIORITY FOR AUSTRALIAN PET OWNERS

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One in four Aussie pet owners waits for their companion animal to be sick before visiting the vet!

Recent research from PawClub has shown that Australian pet owners don’t ‘paws’ for their animal’s health. The survey has found 25 per cent of Australian cat and dog owners neglect annual vet visits for their pet, waiting until their animals show signs of illness before scheduling a check-up.

Leading vet and media personality, Dr Michael Archinal, believes prevention is the key to ensuring good pet health, while waiting for symptoms of illness could severely impact the health of pets.

“Dogs and cats don’t often vocalise their pain,” said Dr Archinal. “Given our pets may be masking their clinical signs of disease and discomfort, it is vital that owners schedule a regular check up to identify health conditions before they become more serious.”

Read more from Pfizer Animal Health