College Students, Have you thought it through?

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Anyone can own a cat, but it takes a very special cat lover to go through the trouble of keeping one in an apartment or small house during the college years. If one bothers to get a cat while in college, I think it’s the real deal.

Also, I think college students get a bad reputation for abandoning pets at the end of a semester or upon graduation. If you’re not serious about owning a pet for life or making additional arrangements when you can no longer do so, please do not waste your time. When you commit to owning a cat, you need to be willing to give up to 20 years of your life for him (assuming he is a kitten when you become his owner). If you’re in college, then yes, this cat could very well be part of the package that your future spouse gets when he or she marries you! Your kids will meet this cat if you keep him in good health. So be serious! If you can’t commit, don’t mess with a cat’s life. How would you like to be abandoned?

April Tubbs, an adoption screener at Pet Rescue By Judy in Sanford, Fla., said students often don’t realize the level of commitment that owning a cat requires. A full-time class load, mixed with changes in housing and roommates, sometimes leads to disaster or neglect.

“If anything, just think carefully before you decide to adopt,” she said. “Really consider the cost and your lifestyle and if adding a pet to the mix is the best idea.”

Use our blog as a guideline to better understand your cat and know when something is wrong.And read more from Lindsay Weaver

BECOME A VOLUNTEER

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Are you passionate about animal welfare and want to make a difference by being involved?

Are you dedicated and willing to make a regular commitment to help animals – animals that have been displaced, abandoned and possibly neglected and abused?

If so, you may be just the person they are looking for to become an RSPCA NSW Volunteer.

Volunteers are an integral part of the RSPCA NSW team and play an active part in supporting our work to improve the welfare of animals and protect them from cruelty and neglect. Volunteering involves dedication, commitment and passion. It is a great way to meet new people and be directly involved in the animal welfare cause.

There are many volunteer roles available; some involving contact with animals, while others provide support without direct contact with animals. Opportunities exist to assist with animal care, administration, events, customer service and local community fundraising (roles available may differ between shelters and branches).

Join today at RSPCA NSW

International Students! Register your pet!

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All cats and dogs must be registered before they are 6 months old. If your pet goes astray, the pound or vet can use your pet’s microchip and registration details to contact you and quickly reunite you with your pet.

Registration is cheaper if your pet is already desexed.
Make sure your pet is already microchipped and that you have received your certificate of identification. (If you have not yet submitted your microchipping paperwork – the permanent ID form – and received your certificate of identification you can do this at the same time as your registration.)
Complete a lifetime registration form.
Send the lifetime registration form and your pet’s certificate of identification to us.

Find out more at City of Sydney 

Moving To Australia With Pets

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Thankfully, many people have safely moved their dogs and cats to Australia, and there are plenty of resources and professional pet move specialists available to assist. If a move to Sydney lies ahead and you’d like to bring your furry family member along with you, here are a few tips to get you started.

Start Early and Research the Requirements

Pet owners moving to Sydney should start planning their relocation at least 6 to 12 months before they intend to relocate. Because it’s a complicated process, err on the side of caution by enlisting the help of an expert as soon as you know you’re moving in order to avoid any costly missteps.

Take Advantage of the Resources Available

For people who decide to handle all or part of the move themselves or want to get a head start on settling in, spend some time reading expat blogs (like this one!) and exploring social media like Twitter and Facebook to connect with people who have made this move before you and thus have great tips to share.

Be Flexible

Preparing yourself to deal with the unexpected is easier said than done, but remember that pets pick up on your demeanour and will benefit if you’re able to remain as calm and organised as possible.

Read more at Sydney Moving Guide 

My funny feline

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Ever wonder why your feline roommate does the weird things that she does? Here’s an expanded list of why our kitty friends act as odd as they do.

1. Nail Biting
There are a few reasons that your kitty may bite her nails. One is that she is in desperate need of a trim and is “telling” you to clip them for her. Two, she’s an anxious kitty with a bad habit. Just like humans bite their nails when nervous or bored, so does your cat. As this habit may be hard to break, find the root of the problem to see if it is indeed a ball of nerves causing her to nibble at her nails.
2. Eye of the Tiger
When your cat is giving you the “eye of the tiger” or looking at something intensely, watch out! She’s probably ready to pounce on her next prey. Cats like to examine their victims to ensure that when they are finally ready to spring, it will be for good reason. Unless you don’t want your cat to pounce on the object (think a new pair of Tory Burch flip flops), let her practice her natural instinct.
23 more secrets wait for you to find out from Jana Randall, My Funny Feline

Think Twice Before Adopting: Students Encouraged to Practice Responsible Pet Adoption

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“If you’re thinking of getting a pet, make sure you’re in a stable living situation and you’re ready for that responsibility,” said Jennifer Sirak, adoption attendant at DAWG animal shelter.

“A lot of time people don’t think through the decision to adopt a cat, they have a hard time finding housing that accepts cats, roommates don’t want a cat, animals don’t get along with other animals, and there are a lot of strays,” said Rhonda Douglas, President of ASAP.

“For students who already have, or are thinking of getting a pet, it’s important you keep things at home calm and maintain a safe environment for pets,” said Sirak. Party scenes are not good for them.

If you’re thinking about adopting a pet, think about if it’s the right time for you. Do you really want to commit? Are you ready to handle the responsibility on top of your already stressful workload? Think about how this big step will affect not only you, but also — more importantly — the animal.

Read more from Miranda Velasquez