College students abandon pets as they leave campus

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Many university graduates who had once doted over pets are abandoning cats and dogs as they leave campus, leaving the pets to the mercy of volunteer caregivers.

Many dogs and cats are abandoned after their owners lose the excitement they had felt when they had first got a pet and may then come to recognize just how much work and energy it takes to raise an animal, Gong added.

The increasing number of stray pets on campus has proved a headache for administrators.

“Their numbers increase every year when students are about to graduate,” said Gu Jie, a logistic worker at Southwest University of Political Science and Law, who often feeds homeless cats and dogs on the campus.

She said university workers recently expelled some dogs to make the campus safer.

Chen Mingcai, head of the Association of Small Animal Protection in Chongqing, said the number of abandoned pets has increased on campuses because many students have recently taken a fancy to the idea of keeping a pet and are unaware of how large a responsibility they would be taking on by having one.

Some students exchange pets as gifts or symbols of love. But the fun often ebbs away when the owners are under pressure to finish dissertations and find a job, he said.

Read more from China Daily

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College Students, Have you thought it through?

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Anyone can own a cat, but it takes a very special cat lover to go through the trouble of keeping one in an apartment or small house during the college years. If one bothers to get a cat while in college, I think it’s the real deal.

Also, I think college students get a bad reputation for abandoning pets at the end of a semester or upon graduation. If you’re not serious about owning a pet for life or making additional arrangements when you can no longer do so, please do not waste your time. When you commit to owning a cat, you need to be willing to give up to 20 years of your life for him (assuming he is a kitten when you become his owner). If you’re in college, then yes, this cat could very well be part of the package that your future spouse gets when he or she marries you! Your kids will meet this cat if you keep him in good health. So be serious! If you can’t commit, don’t mess with a cat’s life. How would you like to be abandoned?

April Tubbs, an adoption screener at Pet Rescue By Judy in Sanford, Fla., said students often don’t realize the level of commitment that owning a cat requires. A full-time class load, mixed with changes in housing and roommates, sometimes leads to disaster or neglect.

“If anything, just think carefully before you decide to adopt,” she said. “Really consider the cost and your lifestyle and if adding a pet to the mix is the best idea.”

Use our blog as a guideline to better understand your cat and know when something is wrong.And read more from Lindsay Weaver

BECOME A VOLUNTEER

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Are you passionate about animal welfare and want to make a difference by being involved?

Are you dedicated and willing to make a regular commitment to help animals – animals that have been displaced, abandoned and possibly neglected and abused?

If so, you may be just the person they are looking for to become an RSPCA NSW Volunteer.

Volunteers are an integral part of the RSPCA NSW team and play an active part in supporting our work to improve the welfare of animals and protect them from cruelty and neglect. Volunteering involves dedication, commitment and passion. It is a great way to meet new people and be directly involved in the animal welfare cause.

There are many volunteer roles available; some involving contact with animals, while others provide support without direct contact with animals. Opportunities exist to assist with animal care, administration, events, customer service and local community fundraising (roles available may differ between shelters and branches).

Join today at RSPCA NSW

Why you should think twice before you adopt a kitten

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Each year, a staggering 7 in 10 cats that end up in animal shelters don’t get a happy ending because their time runs out before they get rescued. That is the ultimate price to pay for someone who jumped the gun and added a kitten before thinking it through. Before you add a kitten to your life…I’d like you to do the following:

Think about your time commitment – Kittens need a lot of time for socialization and to learn the ropes in their new home.

How are you on long-term commitments – The kitty pictured at the top of this blog lived to almost 20 and her brother to 15. If you can’t or don’t want to make a 15 to 20 year commitment, a kitten is a bad idea.

Spend time in the cat room – This is another great place to volunteer and get a better feel for the personalities and mannerisms of cats. If you don’t have time to volunteer, spend some time in the cat room before you make a long term commitment.

Where should I find a cat – There are shelters and rescues all over with many cats to choose from. Adopting a cat saves two lives, that cat and the cat that takes their place in the shelter. Check them out on RSPCA Australia  or CatRescue 

Read more from Raining Cats and Dogs